Top 6 Requirements for Becoming a CNA

Top 6 Requirements for Becoming a Certified Nursing Assistant

Top 6 Requirements for Becoming a CNA

One of the easiest ways to break into the nursing field is by becoming a CNA, or Certified Nursing Assistant. Depending on the circumstances, you may be able to become a licensed CNA in as little as three to six weeks. This implies that the requirements aren't too stringent, but that's not the case. In reality, aspiring CNAs must meet many different requirements to earn their certifications and apply for work. The article familiarizes you with the top requirements for becoming a CNA to have the easiest time possible.

Top 6 Requirements for Becoming a CNA

To become a CNA, you will most likely have to meet the following requirements:

  1. Have a High School Diploma or GED - All accredited CNA training programs require either a high school diploma or GED. If you find a program that doesn't require one of these, it probably isn't accredited, which means it isn't approved by the state. Even if you complete such a program, you won't be eligible to sit for your state licensing exam.
  2. Complete a Training Program - With a GED or diploma in hand, you can sign up for a CNA training program. Such programs typically run from three to 12 weeks, and they include classroom instruction as well as clinical training. You may not sit for the state licensing exam without completing an accredited, approved program, so there is no way around this requirement.
  3. Complete Reading and Math Competency Tests - Some CNA training programs require applicants to complete reading and math competency tests. Such tests tend to be quite basic, but it may be worth it to brush up on your skills a little before completing yours.
  4. Earn Your CPR Certification - Most CNA training programs require students to earn their CPR certifications. This is included in some programs, so you may not have to do anything special to earn yours. Other programs require students to obtain their certifications independently. Before enrolling in a program, ask about the CPR requirements so that you are as prepared as possible.
  5. Complete Your Training Health Requirements - Many CNA training programs require prospective students to meet certain health requirements. For example, you may have to undergo tuberculosis screening. You may also need to provide your immunization records and catch up on any you haven't received. Until you do, you may not be allowed to participate in your CNA training program.
  6. Apply for Your State CNA License - The procedure for obtaining a CNA license varies by state. However, in most cases, the first step is to simply apply. You will then be able to schedule a time to take the CNA licensing exam. The exam includes multiple-choice questions and a practical section in which you demonstrate your CNA skills in person. Your training program should have fully prepared you for the exam, so you should be able to pass it the first time without any trouble.

When compared with becoming an RN, becoming a CNA is fairly easy. Still, there are quite a few requirements to meet, and it pays to know what they are before you begin. Once you have the requirements listed above out of the way, you will receive your CNA license and will be eligible to apply for jobs as a Certified Nursing Assistant. Incredibly, you may be able to start in just a few months, so start completing your CNA requirements today.